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View Full Version : what is NORMAL grade attrition....


law_bee
12-22-2006, 08:35 AM
it now appears that the final number is 2. This year it happens to be two high profile people.

Is it reasonable to expect the number to be less than that?

This is why O'brien wanted easier majors to get the number lower.

So out of the 80 scholarship and ~10 walkons etc. we lose less than 3% and this evidence that the system failed.

Could we not randomly choose 90 students at GT and have at least that amount of attrition?

hiveredtech
12-22-2006, 10:35 AM
it now appears that the final number is 2. This year it happens to be two high profile people.

Is it reasonable to expect the number to be less than that?

This is why O'brien wanted easier majors to get the number lower.

So out of the 80 scholarship and ~10 walkons etc. we lose less than 3% and this evidence that the system failed.

Could we not randomly choose 90 students at GT and have at least that amount of attrition?

With exception of that one bad year....it is normal at GT to lose 1-3 players each year...and has been for decades.

We all know the student numbers...as many as half of an entering freshman class does not graduate.

GT65_UGA89
12-22-2006, 11:55 AM
Great point Law.

lonestarjacket
12-22-2006, 12:00 PM
it now appears that the final number is 2. This year it happens to be two high profile people.

Is it reasonable to expect the number to be less than that?

This is why O'brien wanted easier majors to get the number lower.

So out of the 80 scholarship and ~10 walkons etc. we lose less than 3% and this evidence that the system failed.

Could we not randomly choose 90 students at GT and have at least that amount of attrition?

I think the unique situation is losing high profile seniors. Randomly choose 90 seniors at GT and I don't think you have that amount of attrition. (And it wouldn't be 90 students since there aren't 90 seniors on the squad.)

ncjacket
12-22-2006, 12:44 PM
I don't know about that lonestar. The difference between regular students and SAs is that regular students take their classes in a standard progression. Calculus before any classes in your major for example. That's not always the case with athletes. It would be interesting to know if the guys failed sr level mgt courses or whether they were filling out their degree requirements with some of the weed out math classes that get most regular students as freshmen.

RamblinPeck
12-22-2006, 01:10 PM
I think the unique situation is losing high profile seniors. Randomly choose 90 seniors at GT and I don't think you have that amount of attrition. (And it wouldn't be 90 students since there aren't 90 seniors on the squad.)

We have what, 15-20 seniors on the squad? I'm betting that the usual student failure rate in those numbers would be 1/15 or maybe more, but that depends a lot on the major. With CS my killer years were Soph/Jr and Sr I was pretty much just cruising and doing fine, but I know some of my ChemE/AE buddies had hellish Sr years and not so terrible Jr years and failed/changed majors late. So it happens, and I could guess it would be something like 2/30,but that would just be a wild ass guess.

GoldZ
12-22-2006, 02:35 PM
What would be interesting is to find out how many of the 50 or so D-1 programs in bowls have lost senior starters to academics, especially QBs. Anybody wanna bet it's very few?

TampaJacket
12-22-2006, 02:55 PM
I think the unique situation is losing high profile seniors. Randomly choose 90 seniors at GT and I don't think you have that amount of attrition. (And it wouldn't be 90 students since there aren't 90 seniors on the squad.)

If you were to do this, the other point to consider is that senion non-athletes would still be in school if they did what Kenny and Reggie did. Remember, athletes are held to a higher standard, and things that get athletes ineligible would simply be probation for non-athletes.

lonestarjacket
12-22-2006, 11:53 PM
I don't know about that lonestar. The difference between regular students and SAs is that regular students take their classes in a standard progression. Calculus before any classes in your major for example. That's not always the case with athletes. It would be interesting to know if the guys failed sr level mgt courses or whether they were filling out their degree requirements with some of the weed out math classes that get most regular students as freshmen.

I agree, but I am explaining the repeated dismay at this happening to seniors. If someone is fighting to stay eligible, then they are likely to put off the toughest courses till last. Meanwhile, the requirements to stay eligible keep mounting with "progress towards a degree" looming ever more difficult.

You certainly wouldn't hear this much discussion over a freshman that couldn't hack it.

Most people are comparing their personal experience and can't understand how seniors can get in such a situation. In fact, I think it is likely that when it happens it is because they come up on those weeder courses that they can no longer delay.

kirbee
12-23-2006, 12:16 AM
Could we not randomly choose 90 students at GT and have at least that amount of attrition?

I think so. At my FASET they did the look to your left, look to your right, one of you won't graduate routine.

77GTFan
12-23-2006, 01:02 AM
On a basketball thread tonight someone wrote concerning a basketball player that even if a grade issue should cause him to be inelegible it would not be in effect until the start of the next semester.

If that is the case, explain why Scott and Ball are out for the bowl. There would be countless cases of inelegible footballers in bowl games if fall grades could keep a player out. I've heard of many missing a bowl for behavior issues, but this is the first time I remember key players missing a bowl because of fall semester grades. Guys like Clarett at Ohio State and Deion Sanders back at FSU are examples of persons who played in bowls without making the grades in the fall. Anyone know the rule?

JOJATK
12-23-2006, 01:47 AM
I think so. At my FASET they did the look to your left, look to your right, one of you won't graduate routine.

When we got dropped off at our major school, those of us that had already declared a major when enrolling, they had us look at the 3 closest people around us and then said "decide which one of you is going to be here to get your AE degree because 3 out of 4 of you will either change majors, transfer out of GT, or flunk out."

I imagine most of the major schools told their enrolees something very similar, no?

goldmember
12-23-2006, 01:51 AM
This is why O'brien wanted easier majors to get the number lower.

What does this mean?

pocket_watch
12-23-2006, 08:15 AM
It would be interesting to know if the guys failed sr level mgt courses or whether they were filling out their degree requirements with some of the weed out math classes that get most regular students as freshmen.

Very good point. For me, there was never a good time to take a statistics course until the bitter end. I got very lucky.

Statistics are for Losers. :laugher: